Conjunction: unchanging, therefore unchanging

A conjunction is an unchangeable part of speech that connects words in a single sentence and component utterances in a compound utterance. What are its types and what rules of punctuation should be kept in mind?

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The conjunction is not an independent part of speech. Its task is to combine words in a single sentence (eg Piotr and Paweł are my sons. I bought an expensive, but elegant purse) and component statements in a compound sentence (eg Children run and sing songs).

Verb modes. What should you know about this part of speech?

Verb modes: predicative, imperative, and conditional, express some action or state that ...

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Conjunctions, depending on the relations that take place between sentences connected through them, are divided into:

  • subordinate clause - connects the parent clause with the clause clause
  • coordinates - connect sentences complex coordinates

"No" with adjectives. Spelling rules

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The subordinate conjunctions are: that, that, because, although, why, despite why, the coordinates: and, a, but, but, therefore, or, and, if, therefore, therefore. They are all single conjunctions. Compound conjunctions should be considered: although, still.

"No" with verbs. Spelling rules

Writing the particle "no" with verbs causes many problems. Many students don't know how to do this ...

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Conjunctions can also be simple (in, with, o, to, on, under, after, behind) or compound (behind, beyond, above, above, above).

Also noteworthy are correlated conjunctions, i.e. constant, unchanging combinations of pairs of conjunctions:

  • because…
  • insofar as ... as much ...
  • not only ... but also ...
  • as well as a…
  • them ... the ...
  • until ..., until ...
  • If it…

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1. Conjunction? Remember about punctuation!

  • We do not separate compound conjunctions with a comma, but place it before them, eg He came to work even though he had a cold.
  • A, but, but, but, however, therefore, because, because, because, that, if, that is, is preceded by a comma:
  • The comma is not placed before the conjunctions: and, and, or, or, or, or (but note: the exception is when the conjunction is repeated, e.g. I will make dumplings or pancakes for dinner, or it appears after the phrase or interjected phrase, e.g. I really like romances, especially historical ones, and detective novels).
  • In the case of correlated conjunctions, the comma is always put before the second one, eg if I pass the driving test, I will buy myself a car.
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